Home Forums Dog Dog Food and Treats Nutrition requirements of Old English Sheepdog

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    Anonymous
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    There are two kinds of nutrition needed by Old English Sheepdogs. The first one is that the nutrition is similar to that of their ancestors. Ancient English shepherds lived on farms in the southwest of England and were usually fed with mutton and beef, potatoes, corn, oats, wheat and other cereal mixtures. The nutrition contained in this kind of food is more suitable for the digestion of ancient English shepherd dogs and the absorption and utilization of gland function.

    The second category: properly balanced protein, carbohydrate, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin and mineral. The demand for minerals is based on the intake of substances contained in the ancient living environment, which is determined by the genetic genes of their ancestors. If the breeders of English ancient shepherd dogs can properly match nutrition to feed, it will contribute to the development and health of pets. On the contrary, if not properly raised, dogs will have many diseases, such as dry skin, itchy skin or skin peeling, hair loss, erythema, eczema and other skin diseases.

    Thyroid, liver, kidney and other diseases. If it can be raised correctly, it can avoid the above diseases because of the imbalance of nutrition matching. As for the demand of some microelements and minerals, we need to pay attention to the right amount, rather than the traditional concept that the more the better, some microelements or minerals beyond the demand will cause certain damage to the pet’s organs, or even pathological changes.

    For example: calcium, if dogs of other breeds ingest too much calcium and cannot be completely absorbed and excreted, it will accumulate in the kidney, causing kidney stones. But kidney stones are a good source of calcium for ancient English shepherds. It can be seen that the size of its body is huge, and the demand for calcium is also large.

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